Blessed Basil Moreau

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about_blessed_moreauOur founder, Blessed Basil Moreau began Holy Cross more than 175 years ago as a group of “auxiliary priests” who would assist in re-establishing parishes in Post-Revolutionary France. Blessed Moreau saw that spiritual and educational formation go hand-in-hand together making good Christians.

In 1837, at the urging of his bishop, Rev. Basil Anthony Moreau merged his newly formed “auxiliary priests,” which he created two years prior, with an existing group of teaching brothers to establish the Congregatio a Sancta Cruce (hence the initials C.S.C.), which literally means “Congregation of Holy Cross.” The name was taken from the small French town, Sainte-Croix, in which the order was founded. The Cross is not only a part of our name, it is who we are.

While teaching the Gospels and serving as role models of Christ, Blessed Moreau also called on members of Holy Cross to be “educators in the faith.”

Fr. Moreau saw education as “the necessary training for the mind.” He said, “Education is the art of helping young people to completeness; for the Christian, this means education is helping a young person to be more like Christ, the model of all Christians.”

Jesus called on his disciples to spread the Word of God around the world. Following an apostolistic model and while his Congregation of Holy Cross was still in its early stages, Blessed Moreau sent members to developing areas of the world — Algeria, Canada, Bangladesh and the United States — to make God known, loved and served. Our Blessed founder said “Our mission sends us across borders of every sort.” This commitment to mission has led to Holy Cross members founding world-renown institutes of Catholic higher educationparishes and missions on five continents.

Fr. Moreau died on January 20, 1873. On September 15, 2007, Pope Benedict XVI beatified Blessed Basil Moreau — completing the third stage of the process leading to canonization.

Learn more about Blessed Basil Moreau’s vision for Holy Cross and his beatification.